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lakeelmoleader.com November 21, 2017


Congress grills former Equifax, Yahoo CEOs over identity data breaches

09 November 2017, 01:25 | Frank Carlson

Former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Matt Winkelmeyer Getty Images for Glamour

Former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer    
   Matt Winkelmeyer  Getty Images for Glamour

Mayer noted that after Yahoo discovered the first hacks in late 2016, Yahoo required all of its users to change their passwords if they hadn't, and scrapped old security questions.

Last month, Yahoo reported its entire user base of 3 billion accounts was compromised in an August 2013 data breach. She said "really aggressive" pursuit of hackers was needed to discourage the efforts, and that even the most well-defended companies "could fall victim to these crimes".

A representative for Mayer said on Tuesday she was appearing voluntarily.

Mayer apologized during the hearing.

The current and former chief executives of credit bureau Equifax, which disclosed in September that a data breach affected as many as 145.5 million US consumers, said they did not know who was responsible for the attack. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., asked all of those testifying, including the interim and former CEOs of Equifax, Paulino de Rego Barros Jr. and Richard Smith, as well as Entrust Datacard CEO Todd Wilkinson, if they took issue with Nelson's contention that a "mere company" can not withstand persistent attacks from state-backed hackers without the help of the National Security Agency.

Mayer joined former and current CEOs of Equifax in testifying before the committee examining recent data breaches.

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He also said the company is on schedule to release a computer app in January that will allow consumers to lock and unlock their credit data.

Those remarks prompted Committee Chairman John Thune, R-S.D., to ask Mayer why, despite these investments, Yahoo failed to detect the massive 2013 breach for three years. But she also said the U.S. government has to do more to empower law enforcement to pursue and stop hackers, especially the state-sponsored kind.

Senator Bill Nelson said "only stiffer enforcement and stringent penalties will help incentivise companies to properly safeguard consumer information".

She said Yahoo still has not been able to identify the intrusion that led to that theft.

"We verified that it came from Yahoo, but we don't exactly understand how the act was perpetrated", she told the committee.



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